Epidaurus - 01/02/2010



Epidaurus ancient theater


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 Wikipedia:

Epidaurus (Modern Greek: Ἐπίδαυρος, Epidavros) was a small city (polis) in ancient Greece, at the Saronic Gulf. The modern town Epidavros (Επίδαυρος), part of the prefecture of Argolis, was built near the ancient site.
The prosperity brought by the Asklepieion enabled Epidauros to construct civic monuments too: the huge theater that delighted Pausanias for its symmetry and beauty, which is used once again for dramatic performances, the ceremonial Hestiatoreion (banqueting hall), baths and a palaestra. The theater was designed by Polykleitos the Younger in the 4th century BC. The original 34 rows were extended in Roman times by another 21 rows. As is usual for Greek theaters (and as opposed to Roman ones), the view on a lush landscape behind the skene is an integral part of the theater itself and is not to be obscured. It seats up to 15,000 people.
The theater is marveled for its exceptional acoustics, which permit almost perfect intelligibility of unamplified spoken word from the proscenium or skene to all 15,000 spectators, regardless of their seating (see Ref., in Greek). Famously, tour guides have their groups scattered in the stands and show them how they can easily hear the sound of a match struck at center-stage. A 2007 study by Nico F. Declercq and Cindy Dekeyser of the Georgia Institute of Technology indicates that the astonishing acoustic properties are either the result of an accident or the product of advanced design: The rows of limestone seats filter out low-frequency sounds, such as the murmur of the crowd, and amplify/reflect high-frequency sounds from the stage.

16 comments:

  1. Wow! Magnificent one.
    Thanks for sharing Vicky.

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  2. I like the history that you send along with the picture. Great perspective. Thanks for sharing.

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  3. Oh, what a beautiful shot! And what fun -- I've been there! What lovely memories, Vicky! Thank you! Enjoy your week!

    Sylvia

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  4. Thank you for this. I've often wondered how the crown could hear what was going on!

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  5. Lovely scenery with interesting information. Thanks for sharing.

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  6. what a snap, amazing, just like everything else in greece.

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  7. imagine the Father of Oylmpics beginning here. Great shot

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  8. How simply amazing is this structure! And, great sound back in these times is so impressive. What masters they were...fabulous post, Vicki!

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  9. Vicky: That is such a neat capture from your world.

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  10. I love the capture! Quite impressive place and the information about the acoustics of the place is really cool! i've always wondered how they can hear the speaker and you've just answered it:)

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  11. Wow! (jaw dropping) How magnificent! Limestone it is!

    Beautiful composition!

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  12. Amazing and very interesting how the ancient Greeks were able to make a theater with such good acoustics. Beautiful shot!

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  13. Whoa! massively grand! I love the lovely cumulus above it too.

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  14. magnificent! and amazing information, too.

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  15. Lovely shot and info. Thank you

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  16. How lovely to live in Greece, amid all this history...

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Hello, thank you for visiting my blog. I appreciate your comments and suggestions. I will try to visit your blog too. If you like my blog I hope you follow me
Have a nice day, Vicky

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